Bridge

Si-o-se-pol

The Allahverdi Khan Bridge, popularly known as Si-o-se-pol, is one of the eleven bridges in Isfahan, Iran

Built between 1599 and 1602, the construction was financed and supervised by the Georgian chancellor of Abbas I, Allahverdi Khan Undiladze. It consists of two superimposed rows of 33 arches. There is a larger base plank at the start of the bridge, under which the Zayanderud flows, supporting a tea house, which is nowadays abandoned.

About Isfahan
Si-o-se-pol

The Allahverdi Khan Bridge (Persian: پل الله‌وردی‌خان‎), popularly known as Si-o-se-pol (Persian: سی‌وسه‌پل‎, lit. '[the] bridge of thirty-three [spans]'), is one of the eleven bridges in Isfahan, Iran. It is the longest bridge on the Zayanderud, with a total length of 297.76 metres (976.9 ft), and is one of the most famous examples of Safavid bridge design.

Bridge

Khaju Bridge

Khaju Bridge is a bridge in the province of Isfahan, Iran, which has been described as the finest in the province. It was built by the Persian Safavid king, Shah Abbas II around 1650, on the foundations of an older bridge.

Khaju Bridge has 23 arches and is 133 metres long and 12 metres wide. The pass way of the bridge is 7.5 meters wide, made of bricks and stones with 21 larger and 26 smaller inlet and outlet channels. The pieces of stone used in this bridge are over 2 meters long and the distance between every channel and the ceiling base is 21 meters. The existing inscriptions suggest that the bridge was repaired in 1873.

About Isfahan
Khaju Bridge

Khaju Bridge

Khaju Bridge (Persian: پل خواجو ‎ Pol-e Khāju) is a bridge in the province of Isfahan, Iran, which has been described as the finest in the province. It was built by the Persian Safavid king, Shah Abbas II around 1650, on the foundations of an older bridge. Serving as both a bridge, and a dam (or a weir), it links the Khaju quarter on the north bank with the Zoroastrian quarter across the Zayandeh River

Tabi'at Bridge

Tabi'at Bridge

The Tabi'at Bridge is the largest pedestrian overpass built in Tehran, Iran. The 270-metre bridge connects two public parks—Taleghani Park and Abo-Atash Park—by spanning Modarres Expressway, one of the main highways in northern Tehran

Tabiat Bridge was designed by Leila Araghian as part of a local competition for the design of a bridge to connect two parks in north Tehran which were separated by a highway. In designing the bridge, a process which took a total of a year, Araghian wanted it to "be a place for people to stay and ponder, not simply pass

About Tehran
Tabi'at Bridge

The Tabi'at Bridge (Persian: پل طبیعت‎ Pol-e Tabi'at which literally means Nature Bridge) is the largest pedestrian overpass built in Tehran, Iran. The 270-metre (890 ft) bridge connects two public parks—Taleghani Park and Abo-Atash Park—by spanning Modarres Expressway, one of the main highways in northern Tehran.[1] The word tabiat means "nature" in the Persian language.[1][2] The bridge was designed by Leila Araghian and Alireza Behzadi/ Diba Tensile Architecture

Bridge

Marnan Bridge

Marnan Bridge is a historical bridge in Isfahan, Iran.

The current structure of the bridge dates back to the Safavid era, but its foundations are older and possibly as old as the Shahrestan bridge, which dates back to the sasanian era

About Isfahan
Marnan Bridge

See this at night. People selling roasted corn over small fires on the bridge. Young couples walking side by side. Well lit outer walls. Keep small children with you in the central portion of the bridge because it would be easy for them to fall out of the outer arches. Many places to eat are nearby. There was no water when I went, but it was still beautiful. Old and enchanting.

Get the latest packages and discounts / Trip2IRan.org